Salomon de

Brosse

Artistic period 1601 to 1650

Nationality

French

Birth

1571 (Verneuil-en-Halatte)

Death

1626 (Paris)

Biography

Salomon de Brosse (* 1571 in Verneuil-en-Halatte; † December 9, 1626 in Paris) was a French architect.

As son of the famous Protestant architect Jean de Brosse (also Jehan de Brosse) and his wife Julienne, a daughter of Jacques I. Androuet du Cerceaus, he was probably trained by the last master builders of the famous architect family Androuet du Cerceau. After the Edict of Nantes in 1598, his family moved to Paris, where Salomon de Brosse seems to have had considerable success since 1610. From 1612 he was commissioned to build several large castles, most of which are known only for their preserved plans, such as Blérancourt Castle, of which only the corner pavilions and the portal have survived, and Coulommiers Castle, which was destroyed in 1736 except for some remains of the east wing and the moats. In 1615 Salomon de Brosse received his first state commissions. From 1614 to 1626 he was court architect under the title Premier architecte du Roi. One of his most famous pupils was François Mansart.

Today, the north wings of the Palais du Luxembourg are among the few surviving works that are at the same time most representative of his work.